Translation Software In Translation Service Industry

It is easy to start a global business, but it is not simple to reach your potential customers. One of the best ways of reaching your target customers is through their own (mother) language. It is because of this reason that these days business of all sizes, operating in international markets are providing translation services as part of their key communicative decisions.

On the face of it, today the complexity of providing translations service has increased and the demand of modern translation tools and software has risen dramatically in the past few years.

Looking at the present picture of global communication; Computer-Assisted Translation (CAT) with tools such as Trados, Wordfast, Transit, Translation Manager, etc. has become key technology in the translation service industry. It is expected that with the increased number of official languages in Asia and Europe, and ongoing growth of non-English Internet resources, software translation and computer-aided translation systems will become vital tools in everyday work.

The growing significance of communication cannot be addressed by human translators alone and this has further resulted in the demand for modern tools that save time and increase quality, accurateness and efficiency. The different CAT tools are fast becoming a cornerstone of translations projects around the world. At present doing translation without CAT tools is suicidal, is like going into the wild with bows and arrows. Computer-Assisted Translation programs are needed to help translators in their every day chores and take away the burden of repetitive translations. Human translation will be always needed, where the translator is the pilot that needs to take the key decisions in the translations process and take curves smoothly towards the target language and the CAT is like the racing car, essential to move fast and be competitive.

The present CAT tools are still lacking features that would bring much benefit to the international language translation community, such as:

– Competitive prices!!!! The prices for the most popular CAT tools are still too high for the average translator that needs to dig deep into his pocket to come up with the hard earned money.

– Lack of flexibility when used in conjunction with some DTP programs such as QuarkXpress, Indesign, PageMaker, etc. where text export-import operations are needed together with the introduction of TAGS to preserve the text format.

– Exclusive programs not able to work outside of the Windows environment such as the Macintosh or Linux platforms.

– Problems when working with Far East languages such as Chinese and Japanese and European Operating Systems.

– Large consumption of computer resources.

No doubt there is a lot of room for improvement!

The Service Industry – Cancellation Fees and Other Irritations

What do we do about people who book to see us but then fail to notify us that they are not going to keep their appointment? It is one of the dilemmas of running an appointment based service business. Restaurants, beauty salons, hairdressers and counsellors are some of the people affected by this problem. But there are many other types of situations that we also have to contend with.

– Cancellation fees tend to depend on the client. If someone is a regular client and has simply failed to turn up it can be a good idea to telephone them and try to discover if there is a legitimate reason for them not showing. It can be a gesture of good will to waive the fee on the first occasion. If someone has paid in advance for a course of treatments it can deter them from doing so again if they get a forfeit for not keeping an appointment. It depends on how much you want to keep the client. Certainly being over-accommodating and constantly letting clients mess you about does not give a good professional message to clients. They need to respect you, and if they don’t then it can be worth billing them for not keeping their appointment. If you lose them as a client, well it’s not really much of a loss.

– New clients who are a no-show can be invoiced for their lack of appearance, if you have their details, but they rarely pay the cancellation fee. They are unlikely to book again to see you and often have to be written off as one of those things.

– Late arriving clients are often stressed and in a rush. They’re the ones who frequently look at the clock and are aware of how much time you have actually given them. The fact that they were late is irrelevant. They often expect their appointment to start from the time of their arrival. It can be a good idea to intercept their expectations at the start of the session and flag up how much time you have left. That way they will learn to appreciate that if they want a full session they will have to arrive on time in future.

– Early clients are often nervous, nervous of being late, nervous of traffic conditions, of getting lost, they want to get their appointment over with. It can be good to start by defusing their concerns. Maybe make them a drink while they wait, thank them for being so prompt and enthusiastic about their appointment. It can then provide time for them to relax and feel more comfortable.

– Demanding clients may insist on a lot of attention at the beginning of the session and then expect the allotted time to be spent on their treatment. They may feel the need to talk for ages but still want their treatment afterwards. This may be a temporary situation due to circumstances. You may feel that it is important to provide the extra support, give the extra time, answer their phone calls and emails at no extra charge. But be aware that you are a professional and it is important to protect your own time, space and free time too. Be firm if they contact you at inconvenient times and say how long you can give or that it is not convenient at the moment.

– Discounts and free gifts of sessions or products are a personal choice. Sometimes it may be worth offering an inducement for people who pay in advance or who are regular customers, but be aware of setting a precedent. They may well tell other people about your offers. Was it something you provided just for them as a favour? Be conscious of the implications of reducing fees.

Being competitive in a difficult market is often about the extras, the quality of service, the personal touches. But it is still a business and needs to be run professionally as a business. Maintaining a balance can be a tough call on occasion.

E-Commerce Website Development and the Indian Service Industry

The internet as a medium has become a powerful voice in the global village and satisfies the aspirations of millions of lay individuals. Brand awareness among consumers is constantly increasing and it is important that companies connect with customers via various media to stay relevant and market their products. E-commerce has emerged as the key to business engagement and survival in a globalised world where boundaries are being re-drawn and the end user is magnified. Individual empowerment and a proportional increase in disposable income and has resulted in an e-commerce explosion. A purchaser in any part of the globe with the right purchasing capacity can command any product of his or her liking at will thanks to the internet.

E-commerce solutions are extremely advantageous for companies since a physical brick and mortar is avoided. Employee salaries, rent, electricity and other overheads are minimal thus translating into better deals for the end customer. All payment transactions are immediate and virtual offering best terms for a business in terms of cash flow and security. For consumers, the advantages are that they can get any product they desire at will irrespective of seasonal availability for a reasonable price. Travel time is eliminated and comparison shopping gets them the best deals with a few mouse clicks.

Web design and development plays a key role in determining the fate of a business in the online world since the first step in retail e-commerce is the development of a catchy website. It should have an aesthetic look and feel, easy navigational features and proper security. Further, all the products must be showcased effectively. Payment gateways must be secured against malicious attacks and servers programmed to accept heavy traffic. The aim is to master the art of delivering perfect solutions that leave a pertinent and positive impact on end users without compromising on security. A right mix of creativity, technology and strong business acumen goes into the development of successful e-commerce solutions and websites. It is thus a highly skilled and knowledge intensive process that slowly transforms rustic thoughts into world class solutions.

The Indian service industry has grown from strength to strength over the years and has built a solid reputation based on efficiency, timely delivery and cost effectiveness. It encompasses a broad gamut of operations right from software development to back office processes. Many Indian companies have specialised is in the development of e-commerce websites and solutions. They cater to clients from all corners of the globe and have developed cutting edge solutions with their mastery of various programming languages. It is thus no wonder that the services sector has clocked rapid growth over the last few years. The secret of their success has been their ability to adapt and quickly master rapidly evolving technology that is continuously changing n a daily basis.

E-Commerce is a powerful tool that can engineer an instant change to the entire business structure, merchandising, pricing, marketing, and sales process in an organisation and the Indian service industry is playing a pivotal role in ushering this transformation.

Is the Training Services Industry on the Rise?

During the recent economic downturn one of the first industry sectors to suffer was the training services industry.

With many organisations making redundancies, staff laid-off and companies looking to make cost savings, many chose to reduce spending on the provision of both in-house and external training. In many cases training staff numbers were cut and the services of external providers reduced or eliminated. Add this to the cutbacks in the Public Sector and training companies, agencies and training providers in general have been hit badly by the recession.

Why then are many training providers now reporting an upturn in their business with many reporting significant increases in business turnover? The smaller independent networks in particular appear to be benefitting from this upturn, as organisations having reduced their in-house expertise during the recession are now looking to outside experts – in areas such sales training and bespoke management training – to fill their skills gap. Many of these smaller companies have seen a doubling in both inquires & bookings and a leading training company recently reported that last year was their best on record.

On theory for this apparent growth in the training services sector is that companies want their remaining employees to have the necessary skills to help them climb out of recession and take advantage of any economic upturn as it happens. Management training in particular is seen as an area for growth with companies wanting to ensure their mangers get the best from their staff and assist in staff development.

Organisations emerging from recession will also be keen to ensure that all front-line, ‘customer-facing staff’ are ‘skilled-up’ and ready to drive the business forward via enhanced sales and customer service skills. Sales training and sales management training will be key to helping businesses drive revenue growth from both their existing customer base and new customers.

Management training and sales training courses can also help businesses to retain key staff as, not only does training enhance employee skills, but it is also often highly motivational for those attending, with individuals perceiving the training as the organisation investing in them.

Providers of bespoke solutions, where external specialists both design and deliver training to meet a business’s specific requirements, are the most likely to benefit from this upturn. Company Training Managers will want to ensure value for money and that they get the most from what are still, in the main, limited training budgets; i.e. if they are to bring in outside expertise in skills-based management, negotiation, telesales, and sales training etc. they will need to ensure that the specific needs of both the organisation and the individuals attending the courses are met.